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  #1   IP: 38.118.52.76
Old 05-15-2005, 01:22 PM
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Don Moyer Don Moyer is offline
 
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Removing the engine from your boat

Hello,

Iím frequently asked for a set of basic steps that are necessary to go through when removing an Atomic 4 from a boat, so I finally prepared the following list. As my personal experience in removing engines from a boat is limited to the few times I removed one (or lifted one) from one of our own boats, I was hoping that those of you who have had the experience might take the time to contribute to this list. The job of removing an engine is obviously somewhat different for each boat, and Iím thinking that if you look over the list and can think of some item that you had to deal with on your boat, the list will become a more and more valuable tool for this very difficult job.

Thanks,

Don Moyer


BASIC STEPS FOR REMOVING AN ATOMIC 4 FROM YOUR BOAT:

1) Turn off the main battery switch and then remove the large battery cable form the starter solenoid and the large grounding cable from the engine.

2) Close the raw water through-hull, and remove the raw water hose from the inlet of the pump and from the fitting on the aft end of the manifold.

NOTE: When removing the various lines, wires, and hoses from the engines, itís a good idea to attach tags or labels to facilitate reinstallation.

3) Remove the ignition lead from the positive terminal of the coil.

4) Separate the propeller shaft and engine output couplings. An 18Ē pipe wrench is the smallest pipe wrench that will go over the outside diameter of these couplings to hold them while you remove the retaining bolts.

5) Remove the two 9/16Ē bolts holding the exhaust flange to the aft end of the manifold. If these bolts are unworkable, you may be able to separate the end of the hot section from the inlet to the water lift muffler and remove the hot section with the engine. If the hot section is too large to remove with the engine, you may have to hacksaw through the 1 ľĒ pipe directly behind the flange and replace the hot section of the exhaust.

6) Remove the fuel line, throttle cable, choke cable, and shifting cable from the engine. Be sure to close the fuel shut off valve before removing the fuel line.

7) Remove the upper nut from each of the adjustable engine mounts. If the engine is rail-mounted, remove the lag bolts from each of the 4 mounting holes. Itís frequently the case that rust will prevent you from removing the nut from one or more adjustable mounts, in which case you will have to remove the two lag bolts securing the base of the mount to the rail.

8) Remove the four-purchase main sheet block and tackle assembly from the end of the boom and secure it forward on the boom, using several wraps of line (3/8Ē or larger). Many folks remove the main sail before attaching the main sheet to prevent damage. However, itís usually possible to wrap a carpet remnant around the sail to protect it without actually removing it. Connect the main sheet so that the cam cleat is down next to the engine. In this way you can pull up on the line as you lift the engine sequentially and pause from time to time to readjust things as necessary.

CAUTION: It is critically important to move the main halyard aft and connect it securely to the end of the boom to support the topping lift. Most topping lifts are not strong enough to support the boom when lifting an engine out of the cabin area. The tension on the halyard should be checked frequently during the lifting operation to be certain that it is sufficiently tight to keep the boom level.

9) Position the end of the main sheet as close as possible to the lifting eye bracket of the engine. It may be necessary to remove the companion way stairs to get close enough to the lifting eye to connect the main sheet shackle to the lifting eye.

10) As the engine is being raised, dimensions on your particular boat will determine what you will have to do to get the engine aft and into the cockpit. If you can get enough height, you may be able to simply swing the engine into the cockpit floor and slide it further aft. In worse cases, you may have to move a support into the cabin (a small step ladder usually works, and lay a 2x8 or 2x10 from the support to the cockpit on which to slide the engine.

11) Reposition the engine and lifting mechanism to the rear of the cockpit, and then lift the engine until it will clear the side of the cockpit. At this point, the engine can be swung over to a finger pier or to a truck if the engine is being removed on land. If the engine is to be lowered to the ground with the boat on jack stands, you will have to plan to support the engine part way down to add more chain or line to the main sheet, since the average main sheet will not have sufficient length to reach from the boom to the ground.
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  #2   IP: 68.88.79.174
Old 05-17-2005, 03:14 PM
Zack Zack is offline
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Wink Lever Arm Tool

Don, I made a lever arm tool to assist in installing and removing my A4 from a Ranger 29. With the use of the tool I installed my A4 from the back of a pickup onto the motor mounts in fifteen minutes. That time includes the hook up time. I did have the use of a jib crane at our club. Also, help install A4 in Cal29 using boat lift arm in about the same time. Also used chain hoist on both so that I could control small movements. If anyone is interested I will post measurements of the tool. Pictures can be seen at:

http://www.fototime.com/inv/9402B268C3A5B3D

Zack
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  #3   IP: 38.118.52.76
Old 05-18-2005, 05:51 PM
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Don Moyer Don Moyer is offline
 
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Zack,

Thanks for the interesting innovation! It will certainly help folks get their engines in and out of the mounts in "under the cockpit" installations.

Don
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  #4   IP: 216.120.186.2
Old 05-19-2005, 10:02 AM
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marthur marthur is offline
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Measurements

Zach,

You seem to have thought this out very well. Couple of questions: What are the dimensions on the pipe you used? Is the chain hoist hooked to a u-bolt? Do you lift the whole apparatus or connect the engine to the lever inside the boat?

Thanks,

ma
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  #5   IP: 68.88.79.174
Old 05-19-2005, 04:31 PM
Zack Zack is offline
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Measurements

I will get full measurements tonight and post a couple more pictures tomorrow.

I put the tool in the boat, then hookup the chain hoist(on the U-Bolt), then hook the engine lifting eye/point together, then start putting weights on the back of tool until the engine is lifted. Usually take about 80 lbs of weight. Once the engine is counter balanced, moving it in or take it out without all the strain.

Zack

Overall length = 6 ft 4 in of 1 1/4 id pipe
Motor end = 2 inch exposed of .875 od solid rod
Weight end = 1 ft exposed of .875 id pipe

Added 4 more pictures to album

Last edited by Zack; 05-23-2005 at 11:30 AM. Reason: Adding measurements
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  #6   IP: 4.245.179.150
Old 09-07-2005, 01:16 PM
Figment Figment is offline
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I'd like to suggest a refinement to step number 8.

Instead of moving the main halyard aft to the end of the boom to act as a topping lift, it's better to connect the halyard to the wraps of line that secure the hoisting (mainsheet) tackle to the boom. This way, the boom does not experience any bending stress, only compression from the outhaul.

A minor refinement, but a potentially important one for boats like mine, on which the boom is decades old, perforated with abandoned hardware mounting holes, and never really designed to handle bending stress in the first place.
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Old 12-09-2005, 10:48 AM
jkenan jkenan is offline
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One more refinement:

If you have fresh water cooling, you will need to winterize your heat exchanger as the first step (while the engine is still operatioal!).

I'll be taking on the engine removal this weekend. Hope all goes well....
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Ericson 29, Carried Away
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  #8   IP: 216.54.200.157
Old 12-12-2005, 12:24 PM
jkenan jkenan is offline
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Engine is out, and my first thought is that a bigger boat is easily justified for the sheer virtue of having more space to work

A couple of additional suggestions for those about to do the same:

1) Probably the most significant issue I recognized was getting the engine to separate from the prop shaft. As the engine is being raised, it must raise vertically to clear the studs. The nut at the aft end of the reversing gear housing sits inside the prop shaft coupling, and as the engine raises vertically, it literally lifts the prop shaft with it. As soon as the engine clears the mounting studs, I think it is a good idea to swing the engine forward before going any further up, to clear this nut out of the prop shaft coupling. Otherwise, you may risk bending your prop shaft as you pull the engine higher and this nut still has a good purchase. If you don't do this, sure, the engine will tilt as the nut is still caught while the engine is raised, and eventually release. But why put the strain on the prop shaft holding down 1/2 of a heavy engine, or risk a wildly swinging engine when the release finally occurs?

2) The starboard aft engine mounting stud came very close to the base of my water pump, so the clearance was not enough to remove the nut. I loosened the nut as far as it would go, then raised the engine an inch, and then was able to remove the nut. Otherwise, I would have had to remove the water pump to get the nut off. Your boat may have enough clearance, but for those that don't, this worked well and was far easier than removing the water pump with the engine installed.

3) This was my simple oversight, but still good to clarify: Removing the shifting cable cotter pin is not all there is to removing the shifting cable. You also have to remove the shifting cable bracket which is mounted to the reversing gear housing.


Time to dive into the head and manifold...

Cheers.

John
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  #9   IP: 65.27.103.223
Old 02-27-2007, 07:17 PM
hd78half hd78half is offline
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Removing A-4

I find it helpful to remove the starter and alternator to reduce weight, and clearance.
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  #10   IP: 75.109.251.205
Old 07-23-2007, 01:17 PM
J. Fred Bear J. Fred Bear is offline
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Remove engine tips

We (three old guys) removed old A4 and installed Rebuilt A4 from my Pearson
28.

We reinforced the boom with a line running from 2/3 of the distance aft from the goosneck. The line ran over the spreaders and was secured to the bow cleat.


We used two "come-alongs": one to elevate the engine and one, (attached to

the mast inside the main cabin) to pull motor foward.

Secured one come-along to motor (if there's no lifting eye on your motor, a network of heavy line will work).

We removed the companionway ladder AND the bulkhead separating "engine
room" from main cabin interior. (You can do this on a Pearson).



Using both come-alongs we alternately pulled motor foward into the main
cabin and UP, through the companionway, above level of cockpit gunwales.

We then swung the boom and motor to starboard, over gunwales, and down
onto finger dock and rested motor on a piano dolly (4 casters and a 2ft. square of 3/4" plywood).

Yes, the Pearson 28 heeled, but no more than she does when sailing.
Surprisingly......removing and loading the A4's was the easiest job in the
entire process of switching an old motor for a rebuilt one.

Fred Bear
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  #11   IP: 155.91.45.232
Old 06-04-2008, 11:05 AM
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Engine Removal Using the Main Halyard

Engine Removal

I have not removed an atomic 4 but I have pulled other engines with great success (alone) and I have some suggestions which might improve the process.

Rather than use the boom as a beam to lift the engine I connected the main halyard directly to the engine and I connected a block to the back end of the boom and ran a line from the Genoa halyard winch on the mast to the block at the end of the boom to a block on the main halyard. The line acts as an outhaul Ė (some boats already have a line in place like a reef line or a flattening reef line).

The line connected to the boom serves two purposes:
1) It eliminates the bending stress placed on the boom and changes the load to a column buckling load which is much smaller than the bending stress caused by using the boom as a lifting beam.
2) The set up also allows you to move the engine to the back of the cockpit without ever setting the engine down. By tightening the outhaul line wrapped around the Genoa Halyard winch the block connected to the main halyard moves aft raising the engine and moving it back in the boat. (it may be necessary to lower the halyard during this step to prevent the motor from getting too high).

Once the engine is at the end of the boom it is a simple task to rotate the boom out over the dock and lower it.

The same process is used for installing the engine (reversed).

Some of the advantages I found using this technique are as follows:
1) The heavy lifting is all performed using winches that provide very precise control and power.
2) Each step is fairly independent so you can cleat the lines and move back and forth and do everything in small steps. It does not require additional hands which tend to act independently at times and I canít stand asking for help!
3) Once the engine is lifted there is no need to put it down - once the engine is high enough to clear the companionway I cleat the main halyard and start tightening the outhaul to move the engine aft. As the engine moves aft it also gets higher so after several turns I cleat the outhaul and start loosening the main halyard to lower the engine. Once the engine is approximately 1 foot off the cockpit floor I cleat the main halyard and resume tightening the outhaul. After 2 or three iterations the motor is hanging from the end of the boom and ready to rotate out over the dock. The final step is to loosen the main halyard until the engine is on the dock.
4) There is no need to get in harms way under or even near the engine.

Some things to check before starting:
1) Make sure the rig, halyard and winches are in good working order.
2) Make sure the Halyard is long enough to reach the dock when it is on the end of the boom. If not it may be necessary to add a line to the halyard for the lift. If a line is added make sure it is strong enough (non stretch- no nylon) and there is enough clearance to pick the engine and move it to the end of the boom and also reach the dock without repositioning.
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  #12   IP: 68.236.159.218
Old 06-13-2008, 03:17 PM
Chip Hindes Chip Hindes is offline
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Obviously every boat is different; some are way different.

’74 Newport 30.

the engine acccess hatch in the cockpit is neither wide enough not long enough to clear the motor, even with the accesories removed. In my case, I had to first lift it slightly to clear the mounts, then move it forward all the way into the cabin. Drop it on the cabin floor, reposition the lifting tackle on the forward side of an interveing cross beam, then lift it straight up all the way through the sliding hatch before swinging it over the side. I did this with the boat on the hard on jacks, and when it cleared the side of the boat it was some 13 feet above the ground. Kind of exciting, and not in a good way. I had just enough mainsheet travel to drop it into the pickup bed from there. Of course, dropped it most of the way first, then moved the pickup under it.

Also, there was so little clearance between the top of the motor and the cross beam, I had to remove the thermostat housing, alternator and (eventually) broke the tops off the two aft spark spark plugs to get it high enough to clear the motor mounts. I saved the broken plugs and used them as protective plugs for reinstallation.

Also, my boat has a really substantial boom and I believe the weak point in the lifting system was not the boom nor mainsheet, but the halyard system and all its various turning blocks. Note that if you use the halyard, topping lift or any other line which turns at the top of the mast to lift the motor directly, the load on the top sheave is 2X engine weight; as I recall some 650 pounds or more. I moved the mainsheet forward to the middle of the boom, then attached both the main halyard and the topping lift to the end of the boom and adjusted the tension so they were bearing equally. I “twanged” them a couple times while the engine was supported, and they were playing a pretty high note.
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Last edited by Chip Hindes; 06-13-2008 at 03:26 PM.
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  #13   IP: 142.68.122.16
Old 06-27-2008, 06:02 AM
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rigspelt rigspelt is offline
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My boat is in the driveway on a trailer, mast down. How easy is it to rig a lifting tackle when the boat has no mast/boom rigged? Do rental shops have a lifting frame that high off the ground? Don't want to have to call in a crane. Any alternative thoughts?
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Old 06-27-2008, 11:06 AM
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Kelly Kelly is offline
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Rigspelt,

If you're interested, go to the Moyer photo site here and in the Cayocca group, you'll see two pictures of a rig I built to lift the engine from the boat (in my yard) and drop it into a trailer waiting on the ground.

The rig was braced at the base (I used two shallow holes) in order to keep it from slipping fore and aft during the pivoting movement. Controlling forward and aft movement was simple with lines running in both directions, attached to the top of the rig.

My solution was to lift the motor off the mounts and slide it into the cabin using a small cockpit rig while the big lifting and pivoting you can see in the photos.

Kelly
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