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  #1   IP: 63.77.247.130
Old 03-14-2005, 08:52 AM
baldwinmerrill baldwinmerrill is offline
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Spare Parts

In reading this forum, I noticed a large number of comments to spare parts carried on board. Does anyone have a recommended spare parts list?

Last edited by Don Moyer; 11-29-2005 at 07:20 AM.
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  #2   IP: 38.118.52.231
Old 03-14-2005, 08:15 PM
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Don Moyer Don Moyer is offline
 
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This is a really good question, and one that is fraught with myriad variables and personal preferences. For this reason, every time I propose a spare parts list, I feel like I'm raising a flag out of a foxhole that everyone starts shooting at, e.g. why do I list this, but not that, etc.

So, with all my scars, I'm probably in the best position to make the first posting of a list and offer others to jump in and comment. Perhaps our Forum can finally come up with a sensible spare parts list.

I would only offer one suggestion, which is that we consider in this first list the needs of a cruising experience, which I would define as being out of range of our home port for at least two or three weeks. Feel free to comment even on this logic, but my thought is that dealing with a major breakdown (of boat or engine) that one might encounter after being "on the road" for six months to a year, would be beyond the scope of most or our readers.

I'll try to look in now and then, and when all the ideas are in, I'll consolidate the list.

Here's my list:

SUGGESTED SPARE PARTS AND TOOLS FOR CRUISING

The following items should only be considered as a starting point in devising a list of spare parts and tools. Please add or detract from the list as appropriate in meeting your specific needs. Remember, your best assurance against being caught in a threatening situation (or working your way out of one) depends not only on the spare parts that you might have on board, but on a thorough understanding of the different systems in your engine.

SPARE PARTS:

1) Coil.

2) Four new spark plugs.

3) Spare fuel pump.

4) Spare water pump (a spare impeller may suffice if no snap ring is required and the pump is less than 5 seasons old or has less than 500 operating hours).

5) Three or four feet of engine water hose, fuel line (with appropriate sized hose clamps), and a small roll of electrical wire (12 or 14 gauge).

6) A roll of good quality electrical tape.

7) Spare elements for any filters you have on board.

8) Spare fuses.

9) Spare alternator (optional).

RECOMMENDED TOOLS (In addition to normal hand tools):

1) A small digital volt/ohmmeter.

2) A three-foot length of 14 gauge wire with a ring terminal on one end and a clip on the other. This wire can be used to "hot wire" the ignition system in the event of a failure of the primary circuit within the boat's electrical system.

3) Electrical crimping tool and a small supply of ring terminals, butt splices, etc.

4) Remote starter switch (available for about $10 at most auto parts stores).

5) A 12 volt light with alligator clips to use for checking continuity.

6) MMI Service and Overhaul Manual
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  #3   IP: 64.223.238.87
Old 06-09-2005, 04:49 AM
tartan30cirrus tartan30cirrus is offline
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Thumbs up

I would take along a mechanical pressure guage (after my oil pressure problems). Don't forget OIL. What about a gasket kit...light and takes up little space?
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  #4   IP: 140.90.165.126
Old 06-13-2005, 02:10 PM
thomasntrump thomasntrump is offline
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Spare Parts and Tools

I would add an alternator belt (probably more important than an alternator, especially if you stay fairly close to home). Suggestion for "normal hand tools: sufficient tools to install any spare parts you carry. Add anything to that basic list you think might be useful for troubleshooting.
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  #5   IP: 68.238.56.47
Old 06-23-2005, 03:23 PM
tartan30cirrus tartan30cirrus is offline
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Quote:
[Don Moyer]5) Three or four feet of engine water hose, fuel line (with appropriate sized hose clamps), and a small roll of electrical wire (12 or 14 gauge).
What is the fuel line, water hose sizes? Anyone know offhand?

Cheers,
Clint
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  #6   IP: 38.118.55.115
Old 06-24-2005, 06:09 PM
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Don Moyer Don Moyer is offline
 
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Clint,

The hose sizes on a Moyer Marine rebuilt engine are 5/16" (Coast Guard Type A) for the fuel line, and 1/2" water hose. The hose size between the back of the manifold and the exhaust inlet fitting would depend on your particular boat, but this hose is usually 5/8" or 3/4".

Regards,

Don

Last edited by Don Moyer; 06-24-2005 at 06:14 PM.
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  #7   IP: 70.124.37.117
Old 11-29-2005, 12:48 AM
1973 Ericson 1973 Ericson is offline
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I would add a spark plug socket

and some way to prime your fuel lines (a bulb type, Tempo?)
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Last edited by 1973 Ericson; 01-27-2011 at 11:59 PM.
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  #8   IP: 24.211.241.114
Old 12-13-2005, 11:47 PM
jkenan jkenan is offline
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Besides tools arleady mentioned (voltmeter, etc.), tools I've found valuable are:

1) 'Short' SAE cresent wrench set. Good for getting nuts off in tight quarters, especially for carburator. Minimal length of wrenches facilitates working in tight spaces. Also pack a short adjustable cresent wrench.

2) Basic SAE 1/4" socket set.

3) Elecrical wire tool for removing sheathing and crimping up to 16G wire

4) Lockjaw pliers

5) Plenty of screwdrivers (if your clumsy like me, you'll drop of few into areas beyond immediate reach)

6) Sharp razor

Hardware to have onboard:
1) collection of #6, #8, #10, 1/4", 5/16", & 3/8" nuts and bolts. Stainless definitely, panhead AND oval preferably, of different lengths. This can become quite an extensive collection of fasteners, but I've found them invaluable in repairing problems at sea.

2) Cotter pins, clevis pins, and rings, and hose clamps of various diameters.

3) Electrical terminals for 10G to 18G wire, with adequate diameter of terminal ends to fasten onto battery, coil, alternator, and devices.

4) Spare gaskets for Carb to manifold, Carb upper to carb lower, and waterpump. In extreme instances, water jacket, head and manifold gaskets would also be desireable to have onboard, and they're inexpensive.

5) Marval Mystery Oil and Carb Cleaner
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  #9   IP: 66.93.148.194
Old 11-30-2007, 07:22 PM
duncan59
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Tools Tip: Costco has a great set of rachetable SAE wrenches on sale for about $20 right now. Those are worth the money for quick and dirty work in tossing seas... or any work, come to that.

Add a hacksaw, adjustable wrenches, an inspection mirror, and some needle nose pliers. Plus twine, a spool of wire, and duct tape. And bring along that stubby screwdriver that you filed down to a smooth oval for tapping into the gasket and seperating old metal parts.

I would also like to have a list of "quick tips" for temporary get-back-to-land fixes for patching up fuel leaks, fixing compression, overriding electrical failures, improving a leaky gasket, giving an impeller a little more life, clearing a blockage etc. etc. The last thing I would enjoy was getting all queazy over the engine on a tossing sea. If anyone has such a list, pass it on, would you?

PS: Not strictly A4, but one sailing buddy, who taught me the word "redundancy" takes fully-charged power tools (saw and drill) in case he needs to patch a hole with a piece of teak bulkhead (or cut greater access through to the engine). He also has a nice Honda generator ready to go, gasoline powered.
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  #10   IP: 74.73.150.150
Old 11-30-2007, 11:55 PM
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CalebD CalebD is offline
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Not quite off topic but...

I carry a 24" bolt cutter which can be used for cutting away the rigging (among other things) in an emergency. Off topic because I can't think how having this tool would help with the A4.
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  #11   IP: 129.44.172.103
Old 12-01-2007, 02:10 PM
smosher smosher is offline
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and I know 1st hand,,

Spare Eyeglasses
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  #12   IP: 71.98.57.64
Old 12-01-2007, 04:00 PM
baileyem baileyem is offline
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spare parts

Amen to those spare eyeglasses. Being one who is blind as a bat w/o them I wouldn't want to try docking, or anything else w/o my specs.
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  #13   IP: 75.104.22.141
Old 10-03-2009, 07:02 PM
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One more tool

I found a return trip to home to get my "grabber" flex tool for the nut that fell behind a panel, now has a new home on the boat.

ml
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  #14   IP: 164.54.84.36
Old 10-13-2009, 01:32 PM
mac666 mac666 is offline
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how to ID my engine

Hi, there peoples. It's my first post here. I just bought E27(1978) with a4 in it.
My question is how do I know which model of engine I have? If I don't know what I got, how do I make list of spare parts to get?
I am not familiar with A4s at all...it looks nice and simple, but, I'm sure there are tricks to run and tune it.
I have uploaded a couple of pix that might help identifying it...can you tell me which gaskets are most likely need to be changed if I have water in the oil???
Thanks,
Mac
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  #15   IP: 76.7.109.207
Old 10-13-2009, 04:52 PM
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Marian Claire Marian Claire is offline
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The T-stat housing and the oil fill say late model to me. Dan S/V Marian Claire
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  #16   IP: 24.152.140.113
Old 10-13-2009, 05:50 PM
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And the sheet metal flywheel cover. I agree - late model.
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  #17   IP: 206.40.166.218
Old 10-13-2009, 06:41 PM
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Mark S Mark S is offline
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Late model.

Somewhere on this forum Don indicated where serial numbers can be found and what number range means in terms of model year, early or late, and so forth.

Mark
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