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  #26   IP: 199.173.226.236
Old 11-21-2011, 10:31 AM
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East Penn Deka, maker of my batteries.
I used their gels and got over a DECADE of service. Now on year 4 their AGMS are about beat. I really made a mistake switching. I have been studying this a lot lately and have come to the conclusion that AGMS are inferior in every way but one: They tolerate higher voltages.
Thus they can be used in cars and airplanes without advanced adjustable regulators and thus a vastly larger market.

http://www.dekabatteries.com/assets/base/0139.pdf



QUOTE=edwardc;46109]Joe,

What's the source of your chart?[/QUOTE]
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  #27   IP: 216.14.224.14
Old 11-22-2011, 02:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardc View Post
As for the multi-stage smart regulator, you really want to go that way. Not only will it help maximize your battery life, but it will minimize the amount of engine run time required to charge the batteries. The built-in internal regulators are essentially automotive regulators, and back-off to a trickle charge way too soon. Any decent alternator shop should be able to modify an alternator to bypass the regulator and bring out the feild terminals. Just be sure they know its for marine use so they install the proper seals to protect against igniting any gas fumes. The smart regulators will pound the amp-hours into the batteries at the fastest rate they will accept it, until they're about 80% charged. Only then will it back off to a slower charge rate for the last 20%, and then back off to a trickle/sustaining charge.

This minimized engine runtime becomes important when you're passage making, and have to run the engine so many hours each day to maintain your "power budget".
Thanks for the advice on the smart regulator, that's the way I will go. Does anyone have a recommendation on an externally regulated alternator that will easily fit in place of the stock A4 alternator? Seems like I should be able to buy what I need without having to modify.
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  #28   IP: 199.173.226.236
Old 11-22-2011, 03:10 PM
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"Marine" heavy duty externally regulated alternators are very expensive. Delco makes a number of 1 and 3 wire alternators that fit the A4 and can be modified for external regulation, as can the stock Motorola. They are all over FleaBay and also found on this very website.
  #29   IP: 71.59.69.172
Old 08-12-2013, 11:34 AM
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Alternator and blocked arteries

I am seriously considering upgrading my alternator. I’m currently running on a rewound 35 amp atl. Over the past 7 years I have added lots of comfort add-ons that eat up power, stereo, wheel pilot, forward looking sonar, VHS radio, a 3000 watt inverter and the monster consumer, a 2 Gal 11 Amp draw (120 v) water heater. ( 3 large marine batteries #1 a single , #2 2- house)
On a very long sail, over the course of a day, switching back and forth between batteries and refreshing them with a charge I can reheat the water heater for the next nights anchorage.

However, it is a long process as the inverter draws the batteries down, ALL, in about a half hour and it takes another 2-3 to replenish them.
Solution? Speed up recharge tome with a larger alt. ( I considered a Honda or Yamaha 2000 gen. but am leaning far away from that option) After reading the above thread . Moyer's newly offered 70-120 alt seems to be about the best choice and the largest that the A4 could reasonably drive.
After reviewing the wiring for the T30 and the posted wiring schematic offered by Mr. Moyer ( THANK YOU) It looks like adding a larger atl is like having a clogged aorta, pushing more blood won’t help if we have a clog.
The Alt charge wire is a 8ga. Wire and runs a loop, from the alt to the ign switch, to the amp meter, and back to the battery switch, where the wire size jumps up to 4 Ga. (?) battery terminal wire. The 8Ga. length, not counting the small circuit size in the switch and gauge is well over 20’, likely closer to 35’.

It occurs to me that I (we) are attempting to push larger and larger volume and pressure of current through a very small wire, sort of like pushing a 3” fire hose through a ˝ water pipe.
The result, so I am thinking, is that the Alt. works much harder to PUSH the current and the wire restricts how much can actually be pushed through it.
Ill going to run a couple tests on my idea but I wanted to share the thought with you all.

My thinking is upgrade to a 70-120 Alt. and to shorten the run from the alt to the battery, actually down to 3-4 ‘ directly to the battery switch, use a larger gauge 6?? Possibly 4) charge wire and see if I can add on a remote type amp meter so that the charge current does not need to pass through the ignition switch and the amp meter. Sort of a double bypass surgery. I think this will improve charge rates and reduce load on the alternator.
Any thoughts?
  #30   IP: 69.140.244.202
Old 08-12-2013, 12:03 PM
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You can do something like this:




Quote:
Originally Posted by BadaBing View Post
I am seriously considering upgrading my alternator. I’m currently running on a rewound 35 amp atl. Over the past 7 years I have added lots of comfort add-ons that eat up power, stereo, wheel pilot, forward looking sonar, VHS radio, a 3000 watt inverter and the monster consumer, a 2 Gal 11 Amp draw (120 v) water heater. ( 3 large marine batteries #1 a single , #2 2- house)
On a very long sail, over the course of a day, switching back and forth between batteries and refreshing them with a charge I can reheat the water heater for the next nights anchorage.

However, it is a long process as the inverter draws the batteries down, ALL, in about a half hour and it takes another 2-3 to replenish them.
Solution? Speed up recharge tome with a larger alt. ( I considered a Honda or Yamaha 2000 gen. but am leaning far away from that option) After reading the above thread . Moyer's newly offered 70-120 alt seems to be about the best choice and the largest that the A4 could reasonably drive.
After reviewing the wiring for the T30 and the posted wiring schematic offered by Mr. Moyer ( THANK YOU) It looks like adding a larger atl is like having a clogged aorta, pushing more blood won’t help if we have a clog.
The Alt charge wire is a 8ga. Wire and runs a loop, from the alt to the ign switch, to the amp meter, and back to the battery switch, where the wire size jumps up to 4 Ga. (?) battery terminal wire. The 8Ga. length, not counting the small circuit size in the switch and gauge is well over 20’, likely closer to 35’.

It occurs to me that I (we) are attempting to push larger and larger volume and pressure of current through a very small wire, sort of like pushing a 3” fire hose through a ˝ water pipe.
The result, so I am thinking, is that the Alt. works much harder to PUSH the current and the wire restricts how much can actually be pushed through it.
Ill going to run a couple tests on my idea but I wanted to share the thought with you all.

My thinking is upgrade to a 70-120 Alt. and to shorten the run from the alt to the battery, actually down to 3-4 ‘ directly to the battery switch, use a larger gauge 6?? Possibly 4) charge wire and see if I can add on a remote type amp meter so that the charge current does not need to pass through the ignition switch and the amp meter. Sort of a double bypass surgery. I think this will improve charge rates and reduce load on the alternator.
Any thoughts?
  #31   IP: 173.166.26.242
Old 08-12-2013, 01:47 PM
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Talking

It would be much more efficient to use engine coolant to heat your hot water. I have a 6 gallon unit with internal exchanger and 120 for when at the dock. You are correct about the # 8 wire. At your level it is downright dangerous. Alternator output should get to the main buss bar on as short a run as possible using #4 wire; the negative or gnd of the alternator should be at least #4 with known secure connection to the negative side of the batteries. Don't rely on the engine connection in this matter. You will never get more than 50 or 60 amps out of any alternator using the stock mounting position unless you are ready to fry eggs on the alternator.
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