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  #1   IP: 68.33.43.122
Old 08-18-2019, 07:16 PM
ernst ernst is offline
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Question In situ painting? Using POR-15?

I am afraid I will have to do something about corrosion on the outside of my A4, see the attached images. I am afraid if I don't apply a coat of paint it will rust through at some point. I am impressed by what people on this list do with their A-4 antiques but at this point I am not going for beauty, just for utilitarian protection, i.e. rust prevention (or at least limit its progression). Here are my thoughts, please let me know if it makes sense.

First, I do not intend to remove the motor, I am planning to paint it in place. I realize this limits what I can do but I hope that I can get to the critical places to protect them from rust.

Then I have to decide what paint (system) to use. I know Moyers sells a spray paint which would look original but I given that the machine will be in place, I think that protecting everything from overspray will be much more work than brushing.

So I will have to select an alternative paint. I like the original look (which the motor has right now, at least on the small parts of it where there is still some paint left) and I found a brushable paint by Rustoleum which comes pretty close (can't find the link right now). But in the past I have made very good experiences with POR-15 https://www.por15.com (the regular paint, not the high-temperature version; I don't think the outside of an A4 ever gets hot enough for the latter to cure). It seems made for this application since it works best on rusty surfaces. They have a very limited color palette and nothing is close to the original Universal paint but, again, I am going for function not cosmetics. So it would most likely be a glossy black. I expect that the POR15 will not adhere to the few areas where there is still paint left so it will have a splotchy look but I am fine with that as long as the rust is kept in check.

So my plan at this point is as follows:

1) Remove alternator and top of distributor with all ignition cables, wrap the bottom of the distributor in a plastic bag for protection.

2) Wire-brush and vacuum all areas I can get to, using manual brushes of different sizes.

3) Protect surfaces around and under the motor with plastic drop cloths. Wrap the carburator.

4) Apply the POR-15 cleaning solution (Marine Clean) with a brush

5) Wash it off with water, either a fine spray (spray bottle) or brush

6) Put a thin layer of grease around each spark plug where it meets the threads as a lift agent, to avoid that POR-15 'welds' the plugs to the block

7) Apply 2 or 3 layers of POR-15

8) Crack a cold one!

One question I have whether I should remove the manifold which is by far the rustiest part. I am tending not to do it, afraid to open a can of worms. Does that make sense?

All opinions and suggestions welcome!
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  #2   IP: 32.211.28.40
Old 08-19-2019, 09:32 AM
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Al Schober Al Schober is offline
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First tip is to use eye protection. Glasses with side shields or even a full face shield. When going after the existing rust, a small hammer & chisel works on the heavy stuff.
Check the water jacket plate behind the starter/distributor. If that is still installed with bolts, I recommend changing to studs.
I've never used the POR stuff, so no comment. The Rustoleum oil based products work well IMHO, primer first then top coat. The primer is more important than the top coat.
A primer I've used with great success is Interlux Interprotect 2000E - a two part epoxy with moisture barrier. The smallest kit is a gallon size, designed to be mixed all at once for barrier coating hulls. Mixing it in smaller batches is messy, but I've done it by weight. As I recall, the ratio is about 6:1 by weight - check the MSDS sheet to get from volume ratio to weight ratio.
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Old 08-19-2019, 01:57 PM
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capnward capnward is online now
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I used the Rustoleum high heat paints in spray cans with great success. They cured fine. They covered the rust well after a little wire brushing and vacuuming.
Primer in Gray:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
and Aged Copper, which is like the Universal Brown but a little lighter, and more metallic.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
A lot of paints are baked off at the hot end of the manifold, but these are holding up well.
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  #4   IP: 68.33.43.122
Old 08-20-2019, 10:38 PM
ernst ernst is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Al Schober View Post
First tip is to use eye protection. Glasses with side shields or even a full face shield. When going after the existing rust, a small hammer & chisel works on the heavy stuff.
Check the water jacket plate behind the starter/distributor. If that is still installed with bolts, I recommend changing to studs.
I've never used the POR stuff, so no comment. The Rustoleum oil based products work well IMHO, primer first then top coat. The primer is more important than the top coat.
A primer I've used with great success is Interlux Interprotect 2000E - a two part epoxy with moisture barrier. The smallest kit is a gallon size, designed to be mixed all at once for barrier coating hulls. Mixing it in smaller batches is messy, but I've done it by weight. As I recall, the ratio is about 6:1 by weight - check the MSDS sheet to get from volume ratio to weight ratio.
THANK YOU for the emphasis on safety. I don't have a face shield but I will definitely put on safety glasses.

As for paint, I agree that the primer is probably the most important part. An epoxy paint is not the first thing that would have come to mind because of the elevated temperatures, in particular on the exhaust manifold but I am glad it worked for you (I looked at the manual https://j109.org/docs/interprotect-2000e.pdf and it does not seem to give a limit on operational temperature). Incidentally, I think the Interlux Interprotect 2000E primer is now available in quart size, e.g. at Discount Marine; at least that is what google said.

But if I hear no negatives, I plan to stick with my POR-15 plan. I noticed that some others seems to have used it for the Afour, see post #3 by bunnyplanet at http://www.moyermarineforum.com/foru...ead.php?t=9841, post #10 of http://www.moyermarineforum.com/foru...ead.php?t=2735, post #6 of http://www.moyermarineforum.com/foru...thread.php?t=8, various posts in http://www.moyermarineforum.com/foru...read.php?t=657
and quite a few others on the Moyer forums mention it (don't want to clutter up this post with all the links). So far I haven't found any that said bad things.

As for changing the bolts on the water jacket plate to studs, that may be a great idea. I haven't looked at that for ~15 years but I remember it was a bit sketchy. With the alternator out of the way it would be a good opportunity to make the change. What I am concerned about is 'mission creep.' If the bolts are in good shape, I might go for it. But if the bolts look like I might be creating a problem, I will hesitate. Don't want to dig deeper and deeper, taking into account the last sentence of bunnyplanet (again post #3 in http://www.moyermarineforum.com/foru...ead.php?t=9841).
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  #5   IP: 68.33.43.122
Old 08-20-2019, 10:39 PM
ernst ernst is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by capnward View Post
I used the Rustoleum high heat paints in spray cans with great success. They cured fine. They covered the rust well after a little wire brushing and vacuuming.
Primer in Gray:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
and Aged Copper, which is like the Universal Brown but a little lighter, and more metallic.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
A lot of paints are baked off at the hot end of the manifold, but these are holding up well.
Thank you, good to know. As I said in my previous post, at this point I plan to stick with POR-15 but if something comes up that says this is a bad idea, it is good to know there is an alternative.
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